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Expanding the conceptual framework of the spatial population structure and life history of jack mackerel in the eastern South Pacific: an oceanic seamount region as potential spawning/nursery habitat

TitleExpanding the conceptual framework of the spatial population structure and life history of jack mackerel in the eastern South Pacific: an oceanic seamount region as potential spawning/nursery habitat
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsParada, C, Gretchina, A, Vásquez, S, Belmadani, A, Combes, V, Ernst, B, Di Lorenzo, E, Porobic, J, Sepúlveda, A, Paris, C
JournalICES Journal of Marine Science
Volume74
Pagination2398–2414
ISSN1054-3139
Abstract

Juvenile jack mackerel were found in 2009 in the Challenger break and the East Pacific ridge (CHAEPR). This seamount region is ∼3500 km from the coastal historic jack mackerel nursery grounds off Chile (north of 30°S). We reviewed historic evidence of juveniles around this seamount and data on several local environmental conditions: sea surface temperature, chlorophyll-a, wind, turbulence levels, and Eddy kinetic energy (EKE). A Lagrangian model for the early life stages of jack mackerel in the eastern South Pacific was used to assess the potential of the seamount region as a permanent nursery ground. Transport/retention mechanisms were assessed by releasing virtual particles coupled to a growth model into the flow simulated by an eddy-resolving ocean model. Model simulations showed high inter-annual variability for particle retention in the seamount region; high retention levels were associated with low EKE such that the particles were retained for several months. Satellite altimetry has shown a local minimum in eddy activity in the region where the juveniles were observed; this minimum was consistent with the above temporal relationship. The inclusion of the CHAEPR oceanic seamount region as a potential nursery ground for jack mackerel expands the current conceptual framework for the spatial population structure of this species in the South Pacific off central Chile proposed by Arcos et al. (The jack mackerel fishery and El Niño 1997–98 effects off Chile. Progress in Oceanography 49: 597–617, 2001). Finally, we discuss the relevance of seamounts playing a double role (spawning and nursery grounds) from the standpoint of conservation and biodiversity.

URLhttps://academic.oup.com/icesjms/article/74/9/2398/3831740
DOI10.1093/icesjms/fsx065