Home >> Publications >> Annual temperature variation as a time machine to understand the effects of long-term climate change on a poleward range shift

Annual temperature variation as a time machine to understand the effects of long-term climate change on a poleward range shift

TitleAnnual temperature variation as a time machine to understand the effects of long-term climate change on a poleward range shift
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsCrickenberger, S, Wethey, DS
JournalGlobal Change Biology
Volume24
Issue8
Pagination3804-3819
Date Published08/2018
Keywordsclimate change, climate variability, competency window, Dispersal, interior range fragmentation, range shift, Semibalanus balanoides
Abstract

Abstract Range shifts due to annual variation in temperature are more tractable than range shifts linked to decadal to century long temperature changes due to climate change, providing natural experiments to determine the mechanisms responsible for driving long-term distributional shifts. In this study we couple physiologically grounded mechanistic models with biogeographic surveys in 2 years with high levels of annual temperature variation to disentangle the drivers of a historical range shift driven by climate change. The distribution of the barnacle Semibalanus balanoides has shifted 350 km poleward in the past half century along the east coast of the United States. Recruits were present throughout the historical range following the 2015 reproductive season, when temperatures were similar to those in the past century, and absent following the 2016 reproductive season when temperatures were warmer than they have been since 1870, the earliest date for temperature records. Our dispersal dependent mechanistic models of reproductive success were highly accurate and predicted patterns of reproduction success documented in field surveys throughout the historical range in 2015 and 2016. Our mechanistic models of reproductive success not only predicted recruitment dynamics near the range edge but also predicted interior range fragmentation in a number of years between 1870 and 2016. All recruits monitored within the historical range following the 2015 colonization died before 2016 suggesting juvenile survival was likely the primary driver of the historical range retraction. However, if 2016 is indicative of future temperatures mechanisms of range limitation will shift and reproductive failure will lead to further range retraction in the future. Mechanistic models are necessary for accurately predicting the effects of climate change on ranges of species.

URLhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/gcb.14300
DOI10.1111/gcb.14300